Reblogged from what-an-odd-ood  123,351 notes
Reblogged from startrekships  283 notes
startrekships:

The Delta Flyer dropping out of warp; note the nacelles retracting. 
Ships with movable nacelles (Voyager, Delta Flyer, Enterprise E captain’s yacht) look cool, and it can be a good way to achieve a compact design but still let the nacelles move out for proper warp geometry.  But I’ve always worried that too many moving parts could gum up the works.  A solid nacelle pylon just seems more sturdy in battle than a nacelle that has to have gears or whatever moving parts would be in there. 
So I’ve never used retractable nacelles in my designs. What do you think?

startrekships:

The Delta Flyer dropping out of warp; note the nacelles retracting. 

Ships with movable nacelles (Voyager, Delta Flyer, Enterprise E captain’s yacht) look cool, and it can be a good way to achieve a compact design but still let the nacelles move out for proper warp geometry.  But I’ve always worried that too many moving parts could gum up the works.  A solid nacelle pylon just seems more sturdy in battle than a nacelle that has to have gears or whatever moving parts would be in there. 

So I’ve never used retractable nacelles in my designs. What do you think?

Reblogged from clarabosswald  4,916 notes

mizgnomer:

The Tenth Doctor’s Suit Button Analysis - now in Tumblr-image form!

Because the manner in which the suit is buttoned is important.  No, really.  It is!

In all honesty though, I’m rather impressed that DT took it upon himself to change it up.  Keeping up with these tiniest of details is just another sign of how dedicated he was to Doctor Who.

The list owes much to Unfolded73’s Button Analysis on LiveJournal. As far as I’m aware she was the first to do the analysis back in March 2009 and share it with the world.

For the pedant in us all.